Day 7

Share to destroy HIV!

Save your dreams.Share the campaign and destroy HIV.

Your share on Twitter or Facebook becomes your hammer or your welder, which are then used to take out a piece of the sign – so you can do your part to destroy HIV.

Likes, Shares, Tweets, Follower

Save your dreams! Break HIV into little bits! Together with us! And your friends!

With a hammer, grinder and welder, we are destroying Germany’s biggest HIV symbol – a huge metal HIV sign – from 25 November to 1 December 2013. It’s set up in the middle of Berlin for everyone to see. Your share on Twitter or Facebook becomes your hammer or your welder, which are then used to take out a piece of the sign – so you can do your part to destroy HIV.

As soon as you have shared the campaign, artist Maja Explosiv will take up her heavy HIV-destroying equipment to remove your piece of the HIV sign. You’ll immediately get a photo of the debris live from Berlin.

So share the campaign now and follow its progress here via live stream. Help spread the word as far as possible – to all corners of the Earth. Because we can only make a difference together!

Be part of the action:

Facebook.com/jugendgegenaids
Support us on Twitter too: #DestroyHIV

Don’t miss out on our grand finale party on 1 December!

Just in time for World AIDS Day, we are celebrating all that we have accomplished together at our campaign’s grand finale party – along with the newly created patron saint of our dreams. Be there on Sunday, 1 December 2013, in Berlin’s “Alte Münze” former State Mint building: Molkenmarkt 2. Beginning at 10 p.m., you’ll have the chance to see what has become of the HIV sign debris in person and celebrate with us. Live DJ music, snacks and drinks are provided. We can’t wait to see you there!

Save your dreams. Destroy HIV.

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Prevention

What is HIV?

When you have become infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), it attacks your most important protectors: your immune system, or body’s own defences. It uses the cells, which protect you from illness, to multiply and then destroys them. At the beginning, your immune system recognises this virus and the infected cells, and can fight them. But HIV is an expert in adaptation. The virus continually changes its appearance, and your body is soon not able to recognise it anymore. It conquers your immune system until all your body’s abilities to defend the virus are completely exhausted. In this way, a simple illness can end in death. This is when we speak of AIDS, the resulting acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It can only be delayed, not cured.

Jugend gegen AIDS e.V. is a registered, non-profit organisation. The aim of our work is to prevent as many new cases of HIV as possible. Since 2009, we have been bringing attention to the topic of HIV/AIDS Germany-wide.

How can a person become infected?

You can’t get HIV in the train or on campus. The biggest risk of becoming infected with HIV comes from having sex without a condom! This includes vaginal, oral and anal sex. During sex, bodily fluids, which contain lots of viruses in people who are HIV positive, come into contact with your body’s most sensitive skin: your mucous membranes. Blood, sperm, vaginal fluid and rectum fluid are, when infected, harmful to you! This is because your mucous membrane in the vagina or on the foreskin and in your rectum can become finely torn very quickly. This always happens during sex, even if it doesn’t hurt. The infected fluids enter your blood through these fine tears – and if immediate action is not taken, there is no chance of completely ridding your body of the virus.

The stages of illness

It doesn’t take long for HIV to infect the first defence cells – not even an hour. From this time on, you can also infect other people.

1. The acute phase (the first weeks)

Your body creates cells and so-called anti-bodies that are meant to recognise the virus and destroy it. But these are the very cells that HIV infects. The concentration of the virus rapidly rises, and your immune system’s ability to fight off infections slows down. When you catch an infection, you will likely notice it first in the form of a cold.

The stages of illness

2. The chronic phase (the following months or years)

Following the acute phase, your body has managed to stifle the virus, even though it is still in your body. This means you don’t even notice that you are ill – and thus there is the danger of unknowingly infecting others. For a long time, HIV is gathering strength behind the scenes, multiplying slowly incognito so that your immune system doesn’t notice it.

The stages of illness

3. AIDS (after several months or years – with a fatal ending)

Undetected, the HIV viruses have multiplied to such a large group that after several months or even years, depending on treatment, there are more of them than defence cells. Your immune system’s memory doesn’t exist anymore – the cells, the information that you have saved about illnesses which you have already recovered from, have been destroyed by the virus. Your immune system is weak – AIDS has broken out. The common cold could spell the end of you.

The stages of illness

An HIV test provides assurance.

Today, there are a number of good therapies for HIV-positive people that can extend their life for many years by delaying the outbreak of AIDS and enabling a normal life with the illness. These include strong medications, which have many side effects and that have to be taken the rest of your life. HIV limits your choice of career and is a big risk factor in a relationship. Deciding which profession to have is actually not restricted – at least in Germany. A person infected is not obligated to tell his employer about the infection (except of prostitution). He is allowed to practice any profession he wants to. Plus, many HIV-positive people have to deal with prejudices, as AIDS continues to be taboo.

Jugend gegen AIDS e.V. is a registered, non-profit organisation. The aim of our work is to prevent as many new cases of HIV as possible. Since 2009, we have been bringing attention to the topic of HIV/AIDS Germany-wide.

Jugend gegen Aids

Jugend gegen AIDS e.V. is a registered, non-profit organisation. The aim of our work is to prevent as many new cases of HIV as possible. Since 2009, we have been bringing attention to the topic of HIV/AIDS Germany-wide.